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Here’s The Banned ‘Sin City’ Sequel Poster The MPAA Doesn’t Want You To See

A new poster for the upcoming “Sin City” sequel featuring actress Eva Green (“300: Rise of an Empire”) is too sexy for American audiences.

Page Six reports the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) rejected the following “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” poster “for nudity — curve of under breast and dark nipple/areola circle visible through sheer gown.”

The poster has been making the rounds since on Reddit and features the “300: Rise of an Empire” actress alongside the words, “I’ve been especially bad.”

Less revealing posters featuring female leads Jessica Alba and Rosario Dawson have already been released for The Weinstein Company and Dimension Films’ picture.

According to Page Six, Dimension Films is currently “working on a compromise” with the MPAA.

The sequel is in theaters Aug. 22.

Entertainment, News

Here’s What Happens When You Add Airport-Style Security to the World’s Busiest Subway

Beijing’s beleaguered commuters already have to deal overcrowded public transportation, massive traffic jams and air so dirty that biking to work is often not an option. This week brought a new woe: airport-style security at some subway stations, which created massive lines and long waits to get on trains in the first place.

Beijing’s subway network is the busiest in the world, and commuters take about 10 million rides a day between approximately 200 subway stations. Even a small malfunction, like a temporary signal failure, can lead to huge crowds on subway platforms.

“The usual subway security check no longer involves just ‘putting your bags through’ [an X-ray scanner] as commuters now have to be checked as though they are going through airport customs,” The Nanfang Insider reported. Nine stations have instituted the new checks, which according to Beijing police “should not take more than 30 minutes.”

The heightened security comes after attackers threw explosives into a crowded marketplace in Urumqi, western China, killing more than 30 people earlier this month. In response, China has announced a stepped-up fight against homegrown terrorism.

News

Obama: US must lead globally but show restraint

In a broad defense of his foreign policy, President Barack Obama declared Wednesday that the U.S. remains the world’s most indispensable nation, even after a “long season of war,” but argued for restraint before embarking on more military adventures.

Standing before the newest class of officers graduating from the U.S. Military Academy, Obama said, “I would betray my duty to you, and to the country we love, if I sent you into harm’s way simply because I saw a problem somewhere in the world that needed fixing, or because I was worried about critics who think military intervention is the only way for America to avoid looking weak.”

Obama’s speech signaled a concerted effort by the White House to push back against those critics, who contend that the president’s approach to global problems has been too cautious and has emboldened adversaries in Syria, Russia and China. It’s a criticism that deeply frustrates the president and his advisers, who say Obama’s efforts to keep the U.S. out of more military conflicts are in line with the views of the American public.

In a direct challenge to his critics, Obama declared: “I believe in American exceptionalism with every fiber of my being. But what makes us exceptional is not our ability to flout international norms and the rule of law; it’s our willingness to affirm them through our actions.”

Even as the U.S. emerges from the two wars that followed the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, Obama said terrorism remains the most direct threat to American security. But he argued that as the threat has shifted from a centralized al-Qaida to an array of affiliates, the American response must change too.

Rather than launching large-scale military efforts, Obama called for partnering with countries where terrorist networks seek a foothold. That effort includes a new $5 billion fund to help countries fight terrorism and to expand funding for Defense Department intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance, special operations and other activities.

Obama cast the bloody civil war in Syria as more of counterterrorism challenge than a humanitarian crisis. He defended his decision to keep the U.S. military out of the conflict but said he would seek to increase support for the Syrian opposition, as well as neighboring countries including Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey and Iraq that have faced an influx of refugees and fear the spread of terrorism.

“In helping those who fight for the right of all Syrians to choose their own future, we also push back against the growing number of extremists who find safe haven in the chaos,” Obama said.

One plan being considered by the White House is a project to train and equip members of the Free Syrian Army on tactics, including counterterrorism.

Obama’s handling of the Syria conflict has intensified criticism of his foreign policy. After the Syrian government launched a chemical weapons attack last year — a move that crossed Obama’s self-proclaimed “red line” — the president moved toward a military strike on Syria, only to reverse course and seek congressional approval, then abandon a strike altogether in favor of a deal to strip Syria of its stockpile of deadly gases.

The president’s speech came one day after he outlined plans to wind down America’s lengthy war in Afghanistan by the end of 2016. The blueprint calls for keeping 9,800 troops in Afghanistan for training and counterterrorism even after combat missions end later this year, but then withdraw them within two years.

The drawdown plan is central to Obama’s long-standing pledge to bring to a close both the Afghan conflict and the Iraq war, which ended in late 2011. He was greeted by cheers from the graduating cadets when he noted that they had the distinction of being “the first class to graduate since 9/11 who may not be sent into combat in Iraq or Afghanistan.”

Even as he heralded the end of those two wars, Obama said the U.S. would continue to use military force on its own “when our core interests demand it — when our people are threatened, when our livelihood is at stake, or when the security of our allies is in danger.” He also continued to defend his use of drone strikes in places like Yemen and Somalia but called for increased transparency about the program that has long been shrouded in secrecy.

But a centerpiece of Obama’s address was a defense of his preference for acting as part of an international coalition instead of pressing ahead alone. He challenged skeptics who see that approach as a sign of weakness and argued instead that it instead highlights America’s ability to lead on the world stage.

Obama cited recent efforts to rally European support for sanctions against Russia after the Kremlin annexed the Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine. While the president insisted that Russia is now isolated, Obama’s critics contend that his inability to stop Russian President Vladimir Putin from taking Crimea in the first place was a sign of weakness.

Obama also praised ongoing diplomatic efforts between Iran, the U.S. and its negotiating partners — Germany, Britain, France, China and Russia — that aim to strip the Islamic republic of its nuclear capabilities. While Obama said the odds of reaching an agreement are still long, he also said a diplomatic breakthrough would be “more effective and durable than what would be achieved through the use of force.”

“Throughout these negotiations, it has been our willingness to work through multilateral channels that kept the world on our side,” he said.

Entertainment, News

Kim Kardashian, Kanye West Share Wedding Pics

Beautiful bride! Kim Kardashian finally revealed pictures from her wedding to Kanye West. The 33-year-old looked stunning in her gown as she grinned walking down the aisle with her rapper husband. Plus, Kate Middleton had a royal wardrobe malfunction — her bare butt was exposed after a gust of wind blew her dress up. See all of Us Weekly’s top stories from May 27 in the round-up below.

Entertainment, News

Australian paper shows Kate’s bare bottom

One of Rupert Murdoch’s Australian newspapers on Wednesday published a picture showing the bare bottom of Prince William’s wife Kate, refusing to follow a “ridiculous” ban imposed by the British media.

The image was taken during the royal couple’s hugely successful tour of Australia in April when they showed off their infant son George, and was run in the Sydney Daily Telegraph a day after it appeared in German tabloid Bild, which declared she had a “beautiful bum”.

It shows the Duchess of Cambridge’s blue and white summer dress lifted by a gust of wind when the royal couple got out of a helicopter in the Blue Mountains, 80 kilometres (50 miles) west of Sydney.

The Daily Telegraph said British newspapers had refused to run the photo out of respect to the royals, but in a comment piece said this was “an antiquated code of etiquette” under the headline “My bare lady: Derri-heir to the throne is fair game.”

“It seems a bit ridiculous to expect the rest of the world’s media to follow suit, particularly in a world in which flesh and commercialism go hand in hand,” said Telegraph social writer Annette Sharp.

“If the Duchess can’t be bothered protecting herself by having hem weights sewn into her garments, why should the media protect her?”

The duchess is no stranger to wardrobe malfunctions and struggled to control the hem of her red dress as she stepped off a plane in New Zealand ahead of her Australian tour.

Diane Morel, a Blue Mountains local, took the Australian photo and almost deleted it before realising what she had captured.

“It wasn’t until I got home and I popped my camera card into the computer that I realised what I had captured,” the 47-year-old told the newspaper, vowing to donate any money raised from the photo’s sale to a bushfire relief fund.

‘Breach of privacy’

During their tour, the royal couple met survivors and toured the scene of devastating Australian bushfires last year that destroyed more than 200 homes.

It is not the first time Australian media has abandoned royal protocols with two radio presenters causing outrage in 2012 when they duped a nurse at the hospital treating Prince William’s pregnant wife into giving them details about her morning sickness condition.

The nurse who fielded the call later killed herself.

William and Kate have faced numerous battles in the past to protect their privacy by preventing the publication of photographs.

In one of the most famous cases in 2012, French magazine Closer provoked outrage among the royals and sections of the British press when it published paparazzi photos of a topless Kate.

The royals took legal action and French authorities promptly banned Closer from any use or resale of the offending pictures, the most intimate of which showed the duchess topless and having suncream rubbed into her buttocks by William.

The Telegraph argued those photos were taken while the duchess was at a private chateau, but the Blue Mountains picture was on a public street.

“There is a very clear distinction between private and public property,” it said.

The British press reacted with outrage to Bild’s publication with the Daily Mail calling it “a breach of privacy” while blasting a “crude” caption that appeared alongside.

Others reproducted the image but pixelated Kate’s bottom with the Daily Mirror saying she would be “deeply dismayed” by the embarrassing image.

The decision to run the photo sparked division in Australia with one comment on the Telegraph website saying “we’ve all got one, so what’s the fuss”.

Others were more critical. “It doesn’t matter who has had a ‘wardrobe malfunction’, the photo shouldn’t appear in the press,” a reader said.